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Flughumor, aka Dead Fly Art, Fly Art, etc.

February 12, 2010

I’m currently at Naval Air Station Jacksonville for the Armed Services Pest Management Board DoD Pest Management workshop. It’s been a good meeting – many good talks, and it’s always nice to catch up with old friends. During one session, I almost laughed out loud when one of my colleagues from San Diego slid his laptop over and showed some great fly art  images that someome had sent him in an email. Here is a sample:

When I got back to my room that evening, I did some surfing on the net and found many more dead fly creations by the same artist.  Here are a couple more:

Turns out the creative genius is a Swedish guy named Max Magnus Norman. You can learn more about him at his blog, http://www.blogcatalog.com/blog/art-illustrated-adventures-of-swedish-artist-max-magnus-norman-a-swedish-blog , and you can find more of his dead fly photos, or flughumor (I assume this means “fly humor” in Swedish), at his Fotosidan gallery.

This is a great idea – can’t believe I didn’t think of this first!  I’ve already got some ideas brewing for similar dead insect masterpieces…

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3 Comments leave one →
  1. june harada permalink
    February 14, 2010 5:44 pm

    I really enjoyed reading your blog. Tho’ I’m not an entomologist, I took a few courses at UH, which I thoroughly enjoyed and did fairly well in. I majored in Horticulture, back when it was still called that at UH, and grew up with honeybees, as my dad took up apiculture as a hobby.

    I was saddened to learn that Jackson’s have fed on native fauna. My husband kept about 8 or so of them as pets, maybe about 15 years ago. We eventually released them in a forested area outside our back yard when a few died. Even tho’ I’m not a lover of reptiles, they really are interesting creatures.

    I currently work for the City, in the Division of Urban Forestry. I am always on the look out for new harmful pests and diseases that affect our street trees and the few high profile landscape areas that our crews are responsible for maintaining. I don’t have much time to cruise the internet, but I’ll visit your blog again sometime. I especially enjoyed the style of your writing- just enough scientific info, but with lots of personal touch! Great job!

  2. corycampora permalink
    February 18, 2010 8:32 am

    Hi June – wow, thanks for the comment. Always nice to get some encouraging words.

    I’m actually a big fan of Jacksons also. Always liked them going back to when I when I was a reptile crazy kid (before I was enlightened and discovered entomology!). So it is a little sad to me that they are joining the invasives hit list. Nevertheless, it now appears they are a very real threat to native snails and insects.

    Thanks again for the comment.

    Cory

  3. March 1, 2010 8:18 pm

    I am so doing this sometime!

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